Cashier Job Description | Job Descriptions HUB

According to the cashier job description, an individual occupying such a position is responsible for processing payments in various forms or performing different types of monetary operations. Usually, a cashier works in the store, but they can also be employed in other environments.

As a cashier, the primary responsibility of an individual who seeks employment in such a position is to ensure that all monetary operations between the company and customers work flawlessly.

What Does a Cashier Do?

In the job description of a cashier, working with the cash register machines is not the limit. Depending on the company’s MO, an individual employed as a cashier may be required to perform other types of operations, some of them being unrelated to handling currency. For example, if the cashier is employed in a coffee shop, or in other similar facilities, the candidate must also prepare beverages and foods for the customers apart from taking money from them.
Cashier Job Description
Furthermore, according to the same cashier job description, the candidates are also responsible for balancing the drawer at the end of each day and to communicate any discrepancies to the management.

Cashier Job Description for Resume – Responsibilities

Usually, when companies open up such positions, they are looking for individuals who have a keen eye for numbers, who are tidy and who know how to communicate with customers. Performing under pressure and knowing how to work as part of a team are also qualities that may recommend you for this position.

  • Must learn how to work with a cash register;
  • Must be able to scan items correctly;
  • Handle any types of monetary transactions: cash, credit cards, debit cards, and checks;
  • Must be able to return the appropriate change to customers;
  • Issue receipts;
  • Perform returns and refunds;
  • Must be capable of redeeming discount vouchers, coupons or any kind of stamps;
  • Must clean up the work desk;
  • Label and relabel items according to weekly or monthly watch list;
  • Gift wrap items;
  • Must be able to report any issues to the store’s manager;
  • Is required to greet clients upon entering or leaving the premises;
  • Balance the drawer at the end of the day;
  • Present the store’s offer to the client;
  • Recommend products;
  • Must prove extensive knowledge of the store’s products;
  • Keep track of all transaction;
  • Answer any kind of questions regarding the store or its products;
  • Check the pricing of each item, and change the labels if necessary;
  • Must be able to validate any kind of check;
  • Should check for ID in case the customers ask for alcoholic beverages or tobacco products;
  • Cash in WIC coupons or food stamps;
  • Perform refunds if the items bought by the client are damaged;
  • Issue warranty certificates for various items;
  • Change the receipt paper from the cash register;
  • Put the client’s products in bags;
  • It’s vital for the candidate to count the money inside the drawer at the beginning and at the end of each day.

Cashier Essential Skills

  • Communication Skills: a cashier must be able to demonstrate that he or she knows how to communicate with the customers. Communication is not limited to greeting the client upon entering or leaving the store. A good cashier must also learn how to handle each type of customer, especially in a stressful situation.
  • A good candidate must have a mind for numbers. Remember that in order to secure such a position, you must demonstrate that you have a basic understanding of arithmetic. Although most of the operations are performed on a computer, you may be required, at times, to complete balance books or another type of paperwork.
  • Organized. One of the most-sought-out ability for this profession is the ability to keep your workplace tidy, but it does not end here. Apart from knowing how to organize all the papers, you must also sanitize the place at all time.
  • Basic Computer Skills. Keep in mind that most of the actions you will perform as a cashier will involve working with a computer. A candidate that wishes to work as a cashier must be able to demonstrate a good understanding of Microsoft’s Office suite as well as working with special cash registry software like Charisma. Furthermore, in order to make a good impression, you may try to add any additional computer skills you may have acquired like coding, basic software or hardware troubleshooting or other types of courses.
  • Language Skills. All candidates must prove that they have a good commandment of English and/or However, your chances of employment will greatly increase if you’ve mastered other languages.
  • Store Know-How. After employment, the candidate must do its best to learn the store’s products and offers. This skill will be useful when the employee is asked to recommend a certain product.

How to Become a Cashier

According to the official cashier job description, you don’t need any formal training like specialized courses in order to occupy this position. Moreover, most hiring companies have an on-site training program, which will help you understand your future responsibilities.

Education & Training Requirements

Although most companies do not have the habit of asking for studies, most of them will require at least a high-school diploma or a GED. Furthermore, college diplomas or other types of certifications will greatly help you secure a position as a cashier.

During your training, you will need to prove that you have mastered the following qualities: listening, ability to call for help, taking notes, handling money, and knowing where to find answers to your questions. Although some companies out there have a pre-determined training period, such as one month or even two months, most of the companies have short-termed programs that usually don’t last more than a week or so.

At the end of this training period, the candidates must prove they have mastered all the skills necessary to work with a cash registry and with customers without any supervision from the manager or from colleagues.

Work Experience

As in all other industries, experience is a prime factor that determines both salary as well as your likeliness to be promoted. Candidates who had prior experience in customer service branches will have better odds of being hired by top paying employers than others.

However, there are equal opportunities for entry-level candidates as well. Thus, should you have had a job that implied working with customers, it would be recommended to write it in your resume.

Work Schedules

According to myjobsearch.com, a cashier is expected to be available at all times during the hours of operation of the respective business. Thus, sometimes they might be required to take up nightshifts or work during the weekends or even during holidays. Part-time work is common as well.

Career Prospects

According to the cashier job description graph posted on path.indeed.com, a cashier may occupy the following positions:

  • Customer Service Representative,
  • Retails sales associate;
  • Receptionist;
  • Host;
  • Administrative assistant.

According to income reports posted on payscale.com, the average hourly income of a cashier has been calculated at $8. However, the hourly wage can increase up to $11.16, depending on the company’s policies and the candidate’s experience.

Here are some of the top paying companies in the United States, in no particular order:

  • Target Cashier – $8.85 per hour;
  • The Home Depot cashier – $9.75 per hour;
  • McDonald’s cashier – $8.48 per hour;
  • PetSmart cashier – $9.03 per hour;
  • Meijer cashier – $8.72 per hour;
  • DICK’s Sporting Goods cashier – $8.91 per hour;
  • Macy’s cashier – $9.40 per hour;
  • Sodexo cashier – $9.41 per hour;
  • Albertsons cashier – $11.13 per hour;
  • Banana Republic cashier – $10.02 per hour;
  • Buc-ee’s cashier – $11.79 per hour.

Conclusion

All in all, a cashier can have many responsibilities according to the establishment they work in. A cashier job description might entail helping customers and the rest of the employers to maintain the good operation of the shop, apart from putting sales through the tills. If you wish to follow a career in retail, a cashier job is a good entry-level starting point. Another position that deals with clients in the retail industry you might want to consider is that of a customer service manager.

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